Questions and Answers about 'Work effectively in the community sector'

 



 

Are "walkable communities" the way of the future?

Question:
Walkable communities seem counterintuitive to "progress" since they effectively return us back to how life was a while ago.. but they make a lot of sense to me -- that way we would rely less on cars/oil/consumable resources, plus there would be less pollution. There are some drawbacks, of course, but we need to do something to fix this environmental mess. Do you think that there will be a return to communities that are more pedestrian-friendly than vehicle-friendly? Or do you think we have become too reliant on cars, such that people would refuse to accept such a change? Could it work if it is a gradual change? Also, do you know of any cities/towns that are already enacting this type of change, or new places being built that incorporate "walkability"?

Answer:

I think they are a great idea. It isn't going to happen in every sector in every city however, simply because the existing infrastructure is already in place, and those who choose to live in surburbia will continue to so, and be reliant on cars. I do think there is a shift towards cities (at least mine, and others in western Canada) developing walkable communities. It reduces the need for the city to build and maintain large infrastructure developments - so they come out ahead both financially and logistically. For example, if a walkable neighbourhood is developed (consisting mainly of high density condos, row-housing, houses on small lots), fewer roads have to be built and maintained for the same number of people that would be living in a sprawling suburb. People would shop, eat, socialize in their area, without the need to leave frequently. Similarly, fewer kilometers/miles of sewer lines, water pipes, electrical cables...etc have to be installed. Furthermore, often these areas are developed in decaying city cores (in an effort to revitalize the area) and so often the city can use existing infrastructure, reducing their costs. Win- win for everyone! It's interesting because many European cities have very walkable communities - simply because they were established that way to begin with, just as you mentioned. Of course, there are communities that were built around the suburban sprawl concept but it's not quite as prevalent as it is in North America or Australia. Similarly, in eastern Canada (Montreal, Halifax, even Toronto and Ottawa - and Vancouver (western Canada)) there are numerous 'walkable communities'. They were also established prior to the idea that suburban homes were the North American dream. I live in Edmonton, Alberta, which is a relatively new city in comparison to cities like Montreal, Quebec city..etc. I have noticed that there is a shift, though slow, of people beginning to repopulate the downtown core, myself included. My fiance and I moved into an area that was one of the original, settled areas of Edmonton. There are old homes (100 yrs+) on relatively small lots. Over the course of about 40 years, this area became the seedy area of town as the middle class abandoned the core and move to the suburbs. Recently however, with the cost of petrol, taxes...etc, middle class folks have been moving back into the area, revitalizing it. There are city plans all around my community, to build high-density condos, with store fronts on the street level. Furthermore, there is an old city centre airport that is likely going to be shut down (since we have an international one outside the city). There are ideas floating around to build low-rise apts, townhouses and more condos in on this airport land, to make it a completely walkable community. The city plans to extend our Light Rapid Transit train to that community to reduce the usage of cars into the downtown core (you could actually walk to the downtown in about 30min from that area). So, yes, some cities are planning such developments. Even in my area (mainly houses and row-houses, about 20min walking distance to the core) the city is giving grants to stores to renovate their facades, which in turn encourages people to shop in the area, and brings new business into the area. Many, many great (and very diverse) stores have opened up in my walkable area. We don't need to leave for anything except for a hardware store. (My neighbours and I have discussed this at length and there is a consensus that if some hardware store came into the area, they would make a killing, what with all the home renovations that are going on in the neighbourhood!). I realize that many people will be resistant to the change because it's new to them. Once the buildings are there though, they will be lived in. Sure, those resistant to the change will continue to live in suburbia, which is fine since they are already there, and it would be a waste if those areas were no longer used. The next generations however, are the ones that will embrace 'walkable communities'. It's only going to be more expensive to live when they grow up; to buy houses, to buy cars, to eat..etc. If we can put the building blocks in place this generation, they will be more accepting of it in future generations. Also, I think the next generations are going to be much less reliant on cars simply because they won't be affordable to many 'middle class' households. Already car costs (including to buy, insure, and run) take up a higher percentage of the average middle class family's income than 25 years ago! Let's get walkable communities and relevant infrastructure (transit, piping..etc) in place now so that when it's really needed, there is little panic and scrambling. Sorry I rambled. I just think it's going to be required in the future, whether people like it or not. The 'North American dream' of having 2+ vehicles, a large house on a large lot and big box stores

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Why is the LGBT community spreading itself so thin?

Question:
It's called the gay community because it's about homosexual rights. If you're intersex, you shouldn't be a part of the community unless you're LGB. How can you expect equality if you can't focus on a single issue? It's not discriminatory. You can be a part of the transgender community and we will support you but you just can't be a part of a community that has no relation to you. Could an asian person be a part of the African American community? No.

Answer:

One who is transgendered has a gender identity that is at odds with biological sexual identity. One who is in the gay or lesbian community is cisgendered but with a same sex preference. The LGB community are gathered together because of sexual orientation/preference, not gender identity. This effectively identifies the LGB community as cisgendered. For this reason the concept of transgender is as foreign to them as homosexuality is to most of the transgender community. It would be safe to make the assumption that someone who is outwardly trans could be as great of an affront to their sensible definition of self as it would be to someone who is straight. In this, the transgender community stands alone. The only commonality therefore has to be that all of us are part of marginalized sectors of society that often experiences discrimination. However, the trans community was a part of the early LGB movement right from the Stonewall Riots in Boston. It is hard to ignore the connection. Regardless, the differences do exist despite the fact that we all should be in this together. What affects the LGB community can and often does have equal impact on the transgender community. It has been my experience that in questioning those spearheading diversity in the workplace, there is no major issue with LGB due to the fact that it is not an overt deviation of self that is visible to others. Often these people are themselves a part of the LGB community and as such very well versed in the needs as well as the solutions needed for implementing diversity programs and guides for their employers. Their work is judged on its own merit as it should be. Transgendered people on the other hand are overtly different from the norm. As a result these trainers have little or no ability to advocate on the behalf of the trans community and particularly the M2F side of it. Quite simply, often they cannot relate. Therefore, this does come down to the rarity of trans occurrence in the population. Additionally they have to overcome their own prejudices of seeing the trans person as an affront to their own definition of self.

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What does the phrase “community development” mean to you?

Answer:

"Community development is a structured intervention that gives communities greater control over the conditions that affect their lives. This does not solve all the problems faced by a local community, but it does build up confidence to tackle such problems as effectively as any local action can. Community development works at the level of local groups and organisations rather than with individuals or families. The range of local groups and organisations representing communities at local level constitutes the community sector. "Community development is a skilled process and part of its approach is the belief that communities cannot be helped unless they themselves agree to this process. Community development has to look both ways: not only at how the community is working at the grass roots, but also at how responsive key institutions are to the needs of local communities".

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How this affecting travel and tourism sector?

Question:
There is greater opportunity for adventure and alternative destinations. How that affecting travel and tourism sector..? Explain in detail please? Thanks. I dont want any bashing...

Answer:

Reasrched links.Unit 1: The travel and tourism industry - Pearson Schools www.pearsonschoolsandfecolleges.co.uk/.../TravelAndTourism/.../ASGCET... Understand the development of the travel and tourism industry. ✱ Explain the ... not only created directly in tourism but in related industries, for ... Adventure tourists are those who are ..... beach holiday, the greater the demand for activity. http://www.imaginative-traveller.com/responsible-travel/ What we do: Supporting and involving local people. We recruit and involve local people wherever possible.We support and prefer to work directly with local businesses, services and individuals.Our supplies and equipment are purchased locally wherever possible.We aim to work and treat the traveller, local communities and businesses in a fair and just manner.We aim to work with partners who operate their own local initiatives. Small, family-run establishments make up a high percentage of the accommodation we use. Where it is practical but not intrusive we stay as guests of local families. Support ClimateCare Climate care, Rainforest Alliance Rainforest alliance. Imaginative Traveller has recently signed a contract with the Rainforest Alliance to work on responsible tourism practices with our Latin America suppliers.Rainforest Alliance is a not-for-profit organisation that works to conserve the environment and promote sustainable and ethical practices in a number of different industries across the World. One of the industries they are working in is tourism throughout Latin America.They provide training and technical assistance to help local operators and hotels implement best practices and encourage them to seek certification from one of the organisations part of the Sustainable Tourism Certification Network of the Americas.We have signed up to work with them to encourage and motivate our local suppliers. Some of our local operators are already working with the Rainforest Alliance and in this instance our contract with them is simply reinforcing our commitment to responsible travel and demonstrating that it is of the utmost importance to us. For those operators who have not yet agreed to work with them; they will be contacted and encouraged to work on sustainable tourism practices. The aim is that at least 50% of our local partners will sign up but preferably more! The Rainforest Alliance will then also work through them with local hotels/lodges, effectively ‘greening through the supply chain’.We are very pleased to work with the Rainforest Alliance and further demonstrate our longstanding commitment to sustainable tourism. We hope that this will allow us to do even more in Latin America and help responsible travel become an even more accepted and practiced means of holidaying. Opportunities http://www.dnb.co.in/Travel_Tourism/Chapter_3_Challenges.asp India’s size and massive natural, geographic, cultural and artistic diversity offers enormous opportunities for the travel and tourism industry. The promotion and aggressive marketing measures undertaken by the government is expected to aid influx of tourists. The industry would also benefit from introduction of new forms of tourism and development of niche segments.Medical tourism in India has gained considerable popularity in recent years. India has a major cost advantage in this field compared with other countries. In addition to cost advantages, Indian healthcare industry offers state-of-theart equipment, technological advancement, qualified and experienced medical personnel and a blend of modern and traditional medicines. Thus, medical tourism has immense potential in India.Opportunities also exist in ecotourism, adventure tourism, and cruise tourism. Eco-tourism is increasing in popularity, evident in the development of eco-friendly hotels and tour packages. With increasing environment awareness and consciousness among tourists and given efforts undertaken by the government and private players, the ecotourism segment is expected to record handsome growth in the coming years.India holds immense potential in adventure and cruise tourism. India’s greatest adventure tourism assets are Himalayas and its mighty rivers. The peak period for adventure tourism is the “lean period” of cultural tourism. Development of adventure tourism can make India a round-the-year tourist destination. The cruise industry is one of the most promising industries in India. However, strong efforts need to be made to develop this industry. Other forms of tourism such as agri tourism, pilgrimage tourism, heritage tourism, and MICE tourism also hold enormous potential. Prospects http://www.journal.au.edu/abac_journal/may99/article4_f.html Alternative tourism is much more slow to develop due to the intensive planning required to sustain growth. It is much more sensitive to local needs, especially environmental and social, and views economic returns in a long-term perspective. Secondly, Tourist Behaviour: Large groups intent on collecting site

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How do we as Americans effectively create a safe community for ourselves and our neighbors?

Question:
considering our common interests? Will you be my friend, and help me to feel safe today as I walk through the path of life in different camps and sectors of the greater population? and which country are you from, please? If this question is at all adversarial--I wouldn't want to upset the regime.

Answer:

We kill everybody who ain't like we is.

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Why does Barack think investing in the not-for-profit sector is a good idea?

Question:
How will they fund taxes for his other pie in the sky dreams? http://www.barackobama.com/issues/service/ Invest in the Nonprofit Sector Social Investment Fund Network: Obama will create a Social Investment Fund Network to use federal seed money to leverage private sector funding to improve local innovation, test the impact of new ideas and expand successful programs to scale. Social Entrepreneurship Agency for Nonprofits: Barack Obama will a create an agency within the Corporation for National and Community Service dedicated to building the capacity and effectiveness of the nonprofit sector.

Answer:

Great answer to a excellent question. I worked in the non-profit business, and it is a great way to direct funds dedicated to an important social problem and a proven method of addressing chronic problems that government is usual unable to effectively serve. I worked for two non-profits to help Veterans, many of them Combat Veterans from the Vietnam War, but some Korean Vets and WW11 Vets. Some had never been able to pursue assistance until 50 years had past since they served in the military. In all cases, the pay and benefits are relatively low for working in non-profits but the job satisfaction is large and needed in our society. I recommend working in a dedicated non-profit for everyone who is looking to do something for others without regard to enriching yourself other than the most important way of enrichment which is provided by active and socially conscious non-profits, that is to be of service to other humans less fortunate than yourself, or even equally fortunate.

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The primary intent of public policy is to?

Answer:

Have the government provide goods and services that benefit the community that cannot be efficiently/effectively be provided for by the private sector. Examples: national defense--who wants to have a private army? rule of law--enforce contracts, provide rules for orderly economic exchange infrastructure--roads, bridges, dams and many more! The important distinction in my mind is that the public policy implementation must be less expensive than an equivalent service provided for by the private sector. People disagree on how to evaluate public goods and the relative capabilities of government and the private sector. Another problem is the statesman/politician distinction. A statesman will try to influence public policy to do what he/she believes is best for the community. A politician merely seeks to gain and exercise power through partisanship and the trading of favors, which inevitably hurts the community.

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traditional policing?

Question:
what exactly is traditional policing and how does it differ from problem-oriented or community-oriented policing?

Answer:

Community Policing is a philosophy and management approach that promotes community, government and police partnerships and proactive problem solving to address the causes of crime, fear of crime, and other community issues. Community Policing is not a program or project, it is a philosophy, a way each department member from the top to bottom, sworn to non-sworn, paid to volunteer, view their job. This philosophy must permeate the entire organization, local government and community, not just the "community policing officers" or the patrol division for example. Community Policing requires a leadership and management approach which supports decision-making at the level closest to the problem or issue being addressed; where department members are provided the permission, authority, and accountability to approach problem-solving with non-traditional, and often creative methods. As the private sector realizes, traditional bureaucratic, top-down decision-making many times impedes creative problem solving and effective customer service, two important aspects of community policing. Community Policing recognizes that crime is not just a police problem but a community problem and long term, effective solutions require involvement by all of those involved – the community, local government officials/agencies, and the police. Community Policing endorses a structured process for identifying, analyzing, and developing solutions to community problems which provide the best opportunity for long-term resolution. In addition to dealing with crime problems, community policing also recognizes that often times community members are more concerned with community issues or fear of crime problems than actual crime itself. These include such matters as abandoned cars, burnt-out streetlights, and other quality of life issues. Research tells us that if we effectively deal with these issues, the community’s perception of and support for the police increase and they often feel safer in their community. The key elements to Community Policing focus around three interrelated core components. These vital components are community partnerships/engagement, problem solving and organizational change, in addition to crime prevention. Community Policing recognizes that police work is not an isolated activity performed in a social vacuum. Even traditional police work, including preventative patrol, rapid response, and apprehending offenders, cannot be performed without the regular cooperation of the citizens. Community Policing also recognizes that while traditional arrests may often be necessary, and will continue to be necessary, there are many situations in which other less traditional alternatives may be more effective in dealing with the problem long term. Frequently these methods are merely follow up measures of traditional policing procedures. Community Policing requires a department to be flexible and open to change. This involves nearly every aspect of the organization, including, but not limited to, resource allocation, performance appraisals, information flow, recruitment, selection, promotion, and the overall mission of the department. The intent and purpose of these programs, projects, and activities would be to provide our citizens and society with the information and knowledge necessary to deal with today’s problems, teamed with the confidence and comfort of working together with the officers of this department to accomplish this objective. The Community Oriented Policing/Problem Solving philosophy can be instilled into the department and community, while maintaining traditional policing practices. The results will be a win/win situation benefiting both the people and the police. Police departments must maintain an open-minded objectiveness and be able to flex to the needs of the community, without the fear of change. Social trends and concerns change constantly, and so must the development of effective solutions. Police officers and citizens alike need the perceptive vision and skilled desire to ‘color outside the lines’ in the search for community quality enhancement.

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Can you advise where I can find info on the Accountability & importance of statistics in non profit sector?

Question:
Can you advise where I can find info on the Accountability & importance of statistics in non profit sector.. This is for a presentation.. I have the information about the accountability but I have not been able to find any information on the importance of the statistics.

Answer:

If you are passionate about an idea or service that benefits the lives of others, you might want to start a nonprofit. Nonprofits comprise a growing business segment in the United States. The National Center for Charitable Statistics reports that the number of nonprofits registered with the Internal Revenue Service grew 27.3 percent from 1995 to 2005. However, it is wise to first take into consideration the pros and cons. Clearing Up Misconceptions The Free Management Library notes that people sometimes start nonprofits for the wrong reasons. A nonprofit is not a way of generating income and, sometimes, community problems are more easily solved through means other than a new nonprofit. Founders must have both passion for their cause and entrepreneurial skills. It takes time and effort to start a new organization -- a process that may not provide a steady paycheck. Check the Competition A new nonprofit should not duplicate the efforts of others. Many nonprofits already exist that do good work. Duplication makes it difficult for new and established nonprofits to attract enough donors. According to the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, there may be other ways to more efficiently and effectively meet your goals, such as collaborating with an already established nonprofit on a new program. Environment The nonprofit sector faces more challenges today than in the past, such as increased demand for public accountability. Legislators and regulators look into the affairs of nonprofits more often, and the public is more inclined to check a nonprofit's financial documents before making donations. Particularly in tough economic times, there is increased demand for nonprofit services but also increased competition among nonprofits for grants, the amount of which depends on economic conditions. Incorporation Offers Tax Benefits Incorporation gives an organization separate legal status from the people who create or run it. The process usually requires filing articles of incorporation with state government. Incorporation provides nonprofits with eligibility for various tax-exemptions, gives the nonprofit's leadership personal liability against many types of lawsuits, lowered postal rates and several other benefits. Tax-exemption allows the nonprofit to use more of its funding to fulfill its mission. Some tax-exempt groups also provide donors with a tax deduction for their contributions. The tax deduction helps the nonprofit attract more donations. However, the incorporation process can be costly for nonprofits, which might require the services of lawyer and accountant. After incorporation, the nonprofit must keep detailed records and submit annual filings to government offices. This also increases the nonprofit's operating costs and takes up staff time. Solving Social Problems A nonprofit with a good idea can increase the quality of life for people and their communities. People who establish nonprofits might also fulfill a personal goal. For example, a mother who lost a child to a rare disease might create a nonprofit to help others facing the same situation Your group can be informal nonprofit, such as a group that coordinates the work of a neighborhood watch. The organization can continue with programs and activities informally as long as revenues do not exceed $25,000 per year and the organization does not employ anyone. After that, the nonprofit must register with certain government offices. Read more: Pros & Cons of Becoming a Nonprofit | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_7857361_pros-cons-becoming-nonprofit.html#ixzz1Y3eJDJgM

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What are the harms and causes of poverty? What are some solutions?

Question:
If you could please include the source of where you get the info. Thank you.

Answer:

Poverty is explained by individual circumstances and/or characteristics of poor people. Some examples are: * Lack of education, skill, experience, intelligence. * Health, handicaps, age. * Work orientation, time horizon, culture of poverty. * Discrimination, together with race, sex, etc. On a larger scale: * Low national income (Less Developed Country) * Unemployment issues * Unchecked population growth * Problems in the agriculture sector * Governance concerns * Armed conflict Stephy, I have found you some informative websites on the causes of poverty: http://www.globalissues.org/issue/2/causes-of-poverty http://www.gdrc.org/icm/poverty-causes.htm Solutions are harder: * Community: Empowering groups to identify and utilize local resources effectively. * Policy: Communities work to create initiatives and suggest improvements to programs and to public policy that enhance citizens’ quality of life. * Legislation: Communities work to impact legislation that creates opportunities for citizens to move from poverty to self-sufficiency. * Governments of wealthier countries providing aid for poverty-stricken areas (which most of them do). Websites with solutions: http://www.povertysolution.org/ http://www.makepovertyhistory.com.au/2009-Campaigns/Maternal-and-Child-Health/Solutions-and-Poverty.aspx

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